Is there a way to stop the crop tool from doing a "Zoom to fit" when done?

What features would you like to see in Pixelmator Pro?
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2021-12-04 20:37:58

I usually use cropping to reduce the dimensions of an image and I find it very annoying that an automatic zoom to fit follows the crop.

I have looked through all the defaults (i.e. "defaults read com.pixelmatorteam.pixelmator") that might permit me to change/eliminate that extra, but found nothing easy to spot. Is there such a default?
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2021-12-06 15:58:14

Agreed. This zoom-after-crop behavior looks unexpected. Should definitely be optional, not hard-coded.

One more thought on Crop operation. In v2.3 double-clicking inside active crop cancels the crop - instead of performing the crop. Dear devs, such crop behavior feels very counterintuitive. Double clicking usually means "enter", "advance" or ''commit", not "cancel". Please reconsider or implement an option in Preferences for this behavior.
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2021-12-07 10:35:12

by mccoytest 2021-12-04 18:37:58 I usually use cropping to reduce the dimensions of an image and I find it very annoying that an automatic zoom to fit follows the crop.

I have looked through all the defaults (i.e. "defaults read com.pixelmatorteam.pixelmator") that might permit me to change/eliminate that extra, but found nothing easy to spot. Is there such a default?
There isn't one at the moment but perhaps we can create a Terminal command to allow opting out of this functionality.
by Alexander Tokarev In v2.3 double-clicking inside active crop cancels the crop - instead of performing the crop. Dear devs, such crop behavior feels very counterintuitive. Double clicking usually means "enter", "advance" or ''commit", not "cancel". Please reconsider or implement an option in Preferences for this behavior.
Do you mean this turns off the Crop tool completely? If so, that's not supposed to happen. Double-click inside a Crop box should essentially work as a Reveal Canvas command. It should automatically expand the crop box to fit all hidden non-transparent pixels, if any.
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2021-12-07 11:27:41

Double-click inside a Crop box should essentially work as a Reveal Canvas command. It should automatically expand the crop box to fit all hidden non-transparent pixels, if any.
Ah, now I see: what I perceived as 'cancel crop' behavior, is actually a Reveal Canvas command…

Well, in that case I'd strongly suggest making a user Preference for that:

Double-clicking inside Crop Area: (•) Crops the Image () Reveals Canvas
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2021-12-09 08:59:55

by Alexander Tokarev 2021-12-07 09:27:41
Ah, now I see: what I perceived as 'cancel crop' behavior, is actually a Reveal Canvas command…

Well, in that case I'd strongly suggest making a user Preference for that:

Double-clicking inside Crop Area: (•) Crops the Image () Reveals Canvas
I see, thanks for the suggestion! We'll have to think about that. Although, in my opinion, pressing the Return key, as it works right now, seems like a bit more straightforward way to confirm a crop (or apply any other edits).
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2021-12-12 07:08:43

Although, in my opinion, pressing the Return key, as it works right now, seems like a bit more straightforward way to confirm a crop (or apply any other edits).
Quite believe it, especially if you're using the touchpad to crop (or just used to do it that way). But if you're cropping with the mouse, being tied to the Return key means doing a lot of extra steps:

1) releasing the mouse (physical action)

2) shifting your eyes from the screen to your keyboard, find the Return key (attention shift)

3) moving your hand, reaching for the Return key and pressing it (physical action)

4) grabbing the mouse again (physical action).

Multiply that by a zillion times when graphic designers crop images over the course of their careers, and you'll see the effect

If you're using the mouse to crop, a confirmation with a double-click is superfast, because it requires only 1 physical action and zero attention shifts. Moreover, it feels very intuitive, because double-click means (and has always meant) 'go', confirmed', 'execute' on an operation system level.
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2021-12-12 12:26:55

For me it´s just a hit with a thumb on "enter" after adjusting the cropping area; no leaving mouse or display:
Image
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2021-12-12 13:02:18

If you're ok with always keeping your mouse not farther from the keyboard than a thumb's length, you probably don't need any changes in crop tool behavior.
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2021-12-12 14:22:23

A "double-click" as a confirmation would be a nice addition though no question.
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2021-12-14 10:49:25

by Alexander Tokarev 2021-12-12 05:08:43
Quite believe it, especially if you're using the touchpad to crop (or just used to do it that way). But if you're cropping with the mouse, being tied to the Return key means doing a lot of extra steps:

1) releasing the mouse (physical action)

2) shifting your eyes from the screen to your keyboard, find the Return key (attention shift)

3) moving your hand, reaching for the Return key and pressing it (physical action)

4) grabbing the mouse again (physical action).

Multiply that by a zillion times when graphic designers crop images over the course of their careers, and you'll see the effect

If you're using the mouse to crop, a confirmation with a double-click is superfast, because it requires only 1 physical action and zero attention shifts. Moreover, it feels very intuitive, because double-click means (and has always meant) 'go', confirmed', 'execute' on an operation system level.
Don't get me wrong, it totally makes sense. Especially given that double-click to crop isn't at all an alien functionality on macOS (it works this way in Photos, too). I've shared your suggestion with the team. For now, though, the Apply button at the bottom of the Crop tool options pane would bring you closest to the behavior you're looking for. Not as convenient as a simple double-click but no keyboard is needed, either.